An Interview With Ella Gregg

Interview by Melody J. Myers

When accidentally falling into artist management, Ella Gregg has achieved so much at such a small amount of time. Creating her own management company, 321 Artists, managing up and coming band Blushes, and while making an appearance at The A&R Feedback Centre at this year’s BBC Introducing Live, she’s taking every opportunity by storm and making big things happen. With her determined attitude, and big plans Ella proves that anything is possible, but also that we can stumble upon our calling at any time, or anywhere. Her story is inspiring, and hopeful. We chatted about all things artist management, Blushes, and so much more.

Before we start, I just wanted to say congratulations on everything you’ve achieved so far, it’s so inspiring! Thank you for taking the time and answering my questions. First off, how are you?

Thank you so so much! It’s always really strange when people congratulate me or say what I’ve done is inspiring, as sometimes I think we don’t really stop and realise what we’ve achieved, we’re all so focused on working towards the next thing, but if I sit and think how mad the past couple of years have been, I have achieved a lot!

I’m doing really well thank you! We recently unfortunately had to cancel Blushes’ tour midway through due to illness within the band which was gutting, but it’s only made us all so determined to work harder to come back next year with BIG things. So the excitement levels at the moment are high.

A lot of people must wonder what you do as an artist manager, what’s a day like for you on the job? Is it different when you are on tour, or is it the same?

So as an artist manager, I do all of the things you would expect – organising the band’s schedule, booking the gigs, being the voice of the band to others in the industry, dancing in the front row at gigs, working on new releases, but also just being a human being – going with them to doctors appointments, congratulating their personal successes, being someone to call on when things aren’t so great. Being an artist manager is basically being another member of the band, without playing in the band.

I always say that my job is to sell myself, before I sell Blushes, because if people trust me, they will trust who I work with. So most of my day is sending emails, it’s networking and introducing myself.

I’m not in a position where I can be an artist manager full time, so I spend a lot of my time behind a reception in a trampoline park. I’m very lucky in how portable being an artist manager is, I can access my emails from my phone, and all the assets I could need are all on the Google Drive app, so I can literally do everything on the go.

When we’re on tour, I can still work whilst we’re driving (unless I’m on Sat Nav duty, in which I am focused on the task in hand), but I do see gigs as a reward for all the hard work I’ve put into organising each show, so I do take some time away from emails and make the most of spending time with the band, as that to me is just as important.
You’ve become apart of The A&R Feedback Centre at this year’s BBC Introducing Live which is huge, how does this make you feel? From accidentally falling into artist management to being apart of something as big as BBC Introducing Live.

 

It’s absolutely ridiculous. I am extremely lucky. To me, I still feel as if I am constantly learning every single day, and when I saw BBC Introducing Live, I couldn’t believe that such an event had been put together, what a dream?! All of those people in one space, and I knew I could benefit so much from attending. I would never in a million years think I’d be considered to sit in a Feedback Centre, along with industry professionals from the craziest companies and labels and careers. I feel incredibly privileged to be trusted to be able to give emerging artists feedback and advice, because I know how vital that opportunity will be to them. It’s reminded me that there’s always someone watching what you’re doing! I’ve completely made the most of it already, and connected with all the individuals (153!) part of the Feedback Centre on Linkedin and social media, and have already organised meetings and had some interesting conversations.

What was it like being an intern at Secret Sessions? It really opened a whole new world for you, and introduced you to Blushes!
Secret Sessions is such a beautiful thing. For those who don’t know, Secret Sessions is a free platform for emerging artists, and they give artists live and sync opportunities. I was scouted by the founder of Secret Sessions when I was 17 to do an 8 week internship and after that period, I became the Community Manager and in the 18 months I spent there, I signed up over 1000 artists and gave many of them career changing opportunities. If I didn’t get that chance from Secret Sessions, would I even be in the music industry now?

Blushes was indeed one of the bands I discovered through Secret Sessions. I found so many gems through Secret Sessions, but there was something about Blushes which I just knew I couldn’t not explore further, and I’m so glad I did.

Speaking of Blushes who happen to be my new favorites, how did you become their manager? What’s it like working with them? Do we see an album coming out in the near future?

(Blushes are my favourites too). It’s actually quite a funny story, because I had absolutely no intention of becoming their music, or even working in the music industry for that matter. (I spent 5 years as a police cadet, and was convinced I was going to join the police force.) When I first discovered Blushes whilst I was at Secret Sessions, I was introduced to their manager at the time, who was interested in what Secret Sessions did, so I met up with them and went through it in more detail. After the meeting, they told me that they could really see my passion and enthusiasm and they wanted me to start working with Blushes under their management company.

At first, I was helping them really informally just with their social media, and then after a month, I was asked to book their gigs. I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, I was completely out of my depth, I had never booked gigs before. Looking back, the first gigs I got Blushes were a bit disastrous (sorry guys), they just weren’t the best quality, or in the best venues, but I was still learning and I managed to book them a tour which I was pretty proud of.

During this time, their manager began to fade and I was starting to take on a lot more responsibilities when it came to the band, without really realising if I’m honest. Due to circumstances, their manager was no longer able to manage Blushes and I decided that, with the help of Blushes, I would step up to the plate and give it a go at managing them. Within 6 months, they had been played on BBC Radio 1 and featured by NME, appeared on London Live and BBC Introducing.
Being the founder of 321 Artists is an amazing accomplishment. Can you tell us the process of how that happened, and why you wanted to go about creating your own company?
That’s really kind thank you! When I started managing Blushes properly, I knew I didn’t want to manage them under someone else’s company and name. If I was going to manage them, I wanted to do it under my own name, and put my own stamp on it. So I knew I had to create my own company, and I’m so proud of what 321 Artists is, and it’s values, and what it will continue to achieve.

How did you come up with the name 321 Artists?
So I always knew I wanted to focus on emerging artists with 321 Artists, and I wanted it to be a platform that helped artists ‘launch’ or ‘accelerate’, 321 is like a countdown, to something launching, for example a rocket (hence why our logo is a rocket), or something accelerating with support, like a career.

When looking for artists to represent is there anything you look for in particular?
I don’t really look for anything in particular. I will always see the artist perform live before anything. If I stand during your set in complete awe, or you make me want to dance the room regardless of the people around me, you’re a winner. They’ve got to be unforgettable.

You recently did a talk at a school about being an artist manager, what was that like? I’ve noticed that there isn’t really information about what you can do in the music industry, (besides being in bands) is that important to you to share information like that?
I did! And I was absolutely terrified, but I remembered when I was in school, and when we used to have guest speakers in, I was always so interested, especially when they were young. I had a really great time speaking with the students, there were a couple of students who were actually in successful emerging bands, so it was really interesting to hear their perspectives. These students were 15-18, and it was so heartwarming to hear them asking questions about what I do, and what they can do in the industry. You’re completely right, I still don’t think I have come across every single career option in the music industry yet. It’s about listing the skills and hobbies you have, and I am certain you could link at least one to a role in the music industry. There definitely is more to be done in terms of education around the music industry for young people, it’s on my to do list!

What are you most looking forward to in your career/new year? Even if you’ve accomplished so much already!
Well next for me is Introducing Live so I’m hoping I make some new connections there, and learn a lot that I can take into the new year! Next year I hope I can start working with even more artists, especially when we launch a new avenue to 321 Artists which I am SO excited about! I’m so ready for 2019, and who knows what’s to come!

I read that you don’t particularly make a big deal about your age/gender when it comes to being an artist manager, although of course many people do. How do you keep your head up with all the ridicule women get in the music industry?
That’s completely true. I don’t see the need for my gender or age to make any difference when we are discussing an artist, for example. People can’t see who is behind an email, so as long as I remain professional and get the job done to a high standard, my age is irrelevant. I remain very focused and there has only been a small handful of times where I have felt my age or gender has been taken advantage of, of which I have always commented on immediately. I’m very strong willed, and not afraid of voicing my opinion when necessary. But most of the time, I just want to get the job done, that’s my priority.

What advice would you give girls/women who want to be in the industry?
My main piece of advice to anyone wanting to be involved with the industry, is to educate yourself, don’t be afraid of learning. Because the industry is a complicated thing, that most of us are still figuring out, so education is key. Networking is the most important thing, if you enjoy writing, find journalists on social media and drop them a message or email and ask them their story, ask them if they have any advice or if they know of any opportunities you can get involved with. Don’t be afraid to get yourself out there, ask questions, and ask for favours. Even if they say no, you haven’t lost anything, but you can definitely gain a lot from introducing yourself to the right people.

Thank you again for answering all my questions, Ella! We support you 300%, and we can’t wait to see what you do next!
You are absolutely more than welcome. Thank you for giving people the opportunity to share their story and voice.
Keep up with Ella’s journey here :

 

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Night Moves Interview

By Corynne and Kayla Fernandez

Cover photo by Graham Images and Photography

Contrary to their name, Night Moves is far from a Bob Seger tribute band, and are producing cosmic folk-rock, reminiscent of influences like Neil Young and The Flaming Lips with their own added distinct style. Read below as John Pelant, lead singer and guitarist, chatted with us about their high school beginnings, dream festival line-ups, and the progress on album #3.

First off, how are you?

Doing well!  Just got back from playing a festival in Appleton, WI.  We had a blast, in what is apparently, “The Drunkest City In America” ???!?? Yeah, I didn’t believe it either…

The relationship between the band appears to be pretty close-knit. How did you all meet and form what is now, Night Moves? 

Micky and I met in high school and kinda bonded over skateboarding. We eventually played in bands that would perform together from time to time and whatnot, so we grew closer that way. We also had a similar taste in music- Flaming Lips, The Band, George Harrison, Elliott Smith, Neil Young, which kind of turned us into even better friends.  Our current live show band members are all dudes we met years later here in Minneapolis from playing out and about. I think growing up in such a formidable time as high school will inevitably bring you together as Micky and I.

You guys have been together since 2009, and put out your debut album in 2012. How would you say you’ve evolved from Colored Emotions to Pennied Days? 

I think the writing has gotten stronger. I’m better at self recording these days, which is important because a lot of self recorded/demo stuff makes it into the albums. We’ve matured a bit in terms of the bands sound and presentation, although I still have a tough time taking the social media thing seriously.  The multitude of tours we’ve gone on has given a fair amount of knowledge about how the live thing works for us as well as against us. There are business aspects to this band thing I would have never imagined when I started out that I think we are much more adept at these days, but who am I kidding, I’m still learning and figuring it all out.

You’ve been characterized by your 70’s-esque guitar riffs and melodic folky vocal pairing. Musically and lyrically, where do you find inspiration?

I think the band name falsely informs people of this idea that we’re a homage to Seger/70’s rock band music.  That was never the intention, and it still isn’t. We just take stuff from anything we like and that moves us. The name kinda just fit the vibe at the time when we put out the 1st record.  Inspiration is constantly changing.   Lyrics always seem to come from a strange place.  They’re inspired from a variety of experiences and they are usually the last thing to come in the song writing process.  All in all, inspiration is always coming to me in ways I’d never expect.  I’m still trying to figure that all out as well.

Fans interpret music in a rainbow of ways, is there anything you’d like your listeners to take away from your material?

No, I let them continue to interpret it in a myriad of ways.  It’s best if you can get lost and find some element of yourself in the music.

 

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Photo by Erin Pederson

 

What is a day in the life of Night Moves? 

Make coffee/tea. Breakfast, which is usually these days a bagel with egg and turkey and greens.  Go through the damn internet stops, shower, go to work, come home listen to music and work on new songs, crack some wine and continue to tinker with the tunes.  Still trying to finish album #3!

If we’re on tour: Just trying to not die, drink water, hit various gas stations and grocery stores, sound check, show, after party, sleep.

What records have shaped you most as artists? 

“All Things Must Pass” by George Harrison is a big one, Micky borrowed me a copy in Driver’s Ed in high school and it has been a beacon ever since. “Highway 61 Revisited” and “The Freewheelin Bob Dylan” are both very important records that I listened to a lot growing up while learning to play guitar.

Ideal environment for a gig?

Somewhere by a body of water, but also indoors because we’ve had a lot of live sound issues outdoors.  Let’s say with lots of lights and strobes/lasers/fog, that whole thing, I’m talkin a NASA level production of fog and lasers, the big stuff that will make you blackout.  So maybe a mansion that has an indoor pool, but that is also oceanside with a giant veranda full of snacks and tequila? That’s got to exist somewhere, right?  Honestly, as long as there’s good atmosphere you could be in some jack den in the sticks and it’d be fine.

You guys have had played to a variety of audiences, what would be your most memorable gig and why?

It so hard to choose, so I will just mention one.  We played in Ohio back in 2013, right after our first album came out, and only 1 girl showed up along with her dad and brother.  She was wasted and kept calling out for the song “Colored Emotions,” even after we played it 2nd in the set. It was as if she didn’t know we even played it.  The promoter revealed to us later in the night he lost a lot of money on the show and seemed pretty unhappy about it.  He let us stay at his house, but insisted several times we “make beds” before we hit the night life, which felt very odd.  Every place he took us to he seemed to be in poor standing with the folks there and that further gave us a weird feeling about everything, as in this guy is not well regarded around these parts, fuck, what do we do? I guess it didn’t matter because no one showed up to the gig.  We ended up staying out all night and morning in this Ohio town and left at 9am. As we headed out the promoter gave us 5 big pussy willows he stole from his neighbor’s porch, stuffed them in the van. Must have been quite the assemblage to be witnessing rolling down the interstate at 9am looking like a busted, bloated, and broken Pottery Barn prop.

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At the moment you’ve been touring the mid-west. Are there any plans to venture out to the West coast or the East coast in the near future?

Unfortunately, not at the moment. Hopefully, soon though!

If you were given the chance to re-score a soundtrack what film would it be?

Plains, Trains, and Automobiles- it already has some cool tracks, but I love the vibe of what they got going on and I’d love to embellish it a little.

With festival season in full swing, who would make up your dream festival line-up?

ACDC, D’Angelo, Flaming Lips, The James Gang, Mick Taylor era Stones, Mamas and Papas Hologram set

There have been many great albums released this year. What would be your favorite record of 2017?

Maybe 1 of these 4: Thundercat-Drunk, MacDemarco- This Old Dog, or Father John Misty-Pure Comedy, War On Drugs-A Deeper Understanding

Lastly, what can fans and those new to your music, expect from Night Moves this year and perhaps into next year?

Album #3, we’re hoping to start recording it in the fall so we can to put it out next summer~

 

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Chatting With Bane’s World 

Interview by Corynne Fernandez 

Photos by Kayla Fernandez

We had the chance to chat with up-and coming solo artist Banes World in his hometown of Long Beach, CA. Read below, as we sat in the grass in the middle of the coastal version of suburbia, and asked the hard hitting questions like, “Pancakes or waffles?”

How did you come up with the name Bane’s World?

Well, Bane was a nickname my friends gave me in high school; they just swapped the letters of my first and last name. My friend Max, was like “Banes Slanchard, sound like you were trying to say your name drunk. I don’t know where Banes World, came from—I don’t even like the movie, Wayne’s World. So, when it came down to finding a name to put my demos under, I didn’t want to try too hard to sound cool and ended up sticking with Banes World.

 So you have been making music for two years, has music always been a big part of your life? What sparked your interest in making it?

My dad has always played music and my sisters both sing, and music is a big part of my family. I started playing guitar when I was 9, but it didn’t get serious for me until I was 18—about 2 years ago. I was in my friend Max’s band, the kid who gave me the nickname, and he came to me one night and said, “Hey man, I’m recording all this music by myself,”—he was doing the guitar, the vocals, the synth, and everything—and I felt really inspired, which led to me buying my own recording gear and making my own material.

Who or what do you turn to for inspiration?

I get it from a lot of random places. Most times, if I’m in a relationship and something goes wrong, that’s good inspiration for stuff—not that I want that to happen, but it has always inspired me in that way.

Describe a day in the life of Bane’s World.

Nothing super special! I like to eat a ton of really good food, because food is important to me, hanging out with my dog, playing guitar, or skateboarding. It doesn’t change that much, unless I go out for a gig, like to Santa Barbara, but I never really get out of Long Beach.

The writing process is different for everyone, what is yours like? Do you write from personal experiences?

For the album, Drowsy, I would record the music first and then wouldn’t have any idea of what the song was going to be like lyrically. Once I would record the music, I would just sit there a sing little things over it; I can never really write lyrics before I make a song. I don’t have a set process.

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You released ‘Drowsy’ last year, is thereany plans to release an EP this year? Or possibly an album?

Yeah! Hopefully by the end of this year I would like to release a full-length album. Somethings brewing, but I don’t know when it’s going to come.

Your sound is unique compared to a lot of music that’s been put out by other artists today. What genre do you identify most with?

I guess it’s just dreamy stuff, but I pull a lot of influence from what I like. My dad is big on the blues, so that sound was kind of instilled in me. I like all types of music—jazz, bossa nova, pretty much anything. Recently, I’ve been listening to neo-soul and in general, if I like it, I’ll try my best to incorporate it into my sound.

Is there an album or an artist that has changed your perspective on music?

An artist that heavily inspires me and makes me want to do better is, Stevie Ray Vaughan. He changed my perspective on what it means to be a guitar player, because he is so soulful. Nowadays, a lot of bands rely on single chords and it gets repetitive.

What was the first album you ever purchased?

The one I was adamant about getting—it’s really funny—but it was My Chemical Romance, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge; I was really surprised my mom let me get it at the time because I was really young. It was either between, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge or Dookie by Green Day.

You have a handful of California shows under your belt, do you have plans on venturing out to more states or abroad?

I would love to, it’s just a matter of planning it out and getting the monetization for that stuff. I don’t know how artists do that or if their label helps them out with tours. Right now, I don’t have a contracted label. In general, I would love to go out on tour; I think it would be an eye-opening and life- changing experience.

‘People Like Me, People Like You’ is a personal favorite of ours, what’s the meaning behind that song?

I am not sure what my headspace was like when I wrote that—probably after something bad happened. I remember listening to a lot of Tears For Fears and loving their electro-pop, synth heavy sound and wanting to record something like that. The lyric, “born to lose…” which is a Ray Charles song, I liked that because it sounded a little melancholy. That song is a bit of a blur.

Dream festival lineup?

Beatles (full band), Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors, Crosby, Stills and Nash, and the full cast of the Phantom of the Opera.

Dream collaboration?

I would love to do a song with Mac Demarco or Peter from HOMESHAKE; I’d think that would be really cool.  As far as someone who’s dead, Stevie Ray Vaughan—he’s my #1.

Pancakes or waffles?

I’ll never go out of my way to get either of those, but I do like a good Belgian waffle. My ideal breakfast would include, eggs, bacon, hash browns, —okay, waffles with whipped cream and strawberries—maybe some sausage, and an acai bowl. I can eat a ton of food!

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Ardyn Interview

By Corynne Fernandez 

 

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Emerging brother-sister-duo, Ardyn, have released 2 acclaimed EP’s and are currently working on more material–expanding their organic, while equally melancholic, growing discography. Writer, Corynne Fernandez, had the chance to catch up with the pair in midst of their dedicated studio sessions.

Answers by Rob and Katy.

How are you both doing? Are you excited about your upcoming show at Hoxton Hall after selling out your show back in December? 

Very well, thank you. we’re so excited for the show,  to be able to play such a beautiful room, well, we can’t ask for more. it should be a wonderful evening!

For those who don’t know, how did you collectively come up the fronting name, ARDYN? What meaning does it hold, if any?

We named the band after our cousin, Ardyn. she’s also an artist. we spent a while looking for a name and this one just made sense to us.

As brother and sister, did you find it natural to partner musically? Is it simpler to communicate where you want to take the group because of the relationship you share?

Yes it did feel quite natural. We’ve always written together, we never really took it that seriously though. It was only when we began performing our own songs live and started getting decent reactions from outside our family unit that we began to take it more seriously. We often check we’re still on the same page when it comes to ambition, sometimes it’s easy to talk about it, sometimes it really isn’t.  We’re very good at ignoring each other if we want to, but that’s just siblings, right?

You’ve released two acclaimed EP’s since 2015, are there plans to release a debut album this year?

We’re taking our time to get the right songs and get some more experience as writers and performers, to release an album this year would be amazing.

I read that your latest EP, The Valley, was produced by, James Ford (Florence & The Machine, Arctic Monkeys) and Mike Crossey (Foals, The 1975). Can you describe how it was working with them and how it was you all met? 

Working on that particular song, The Valley, was a lot of fun because everything was live, which we like. When it came to recording the song with James Ford we used the demo, it had a great energy that we didn’t think we’d be able to capture again. Mike Crossey mixed that one. The rest of the EP was actually recorded with Rodaidh Mcdonald who did the first EP, Universe.

What were the inspirations behind Universe and The Valley EP’s? How would you say your sound and lyrics have evolved between releases?

The Universe EP came from a very natural place, inspiration came from our surroundings in Gloucestershire. The film Pride and Prejudice inspired me to write The Garden. Call Up was about love and loss. The lyrics especially in songs like Universe and Help Me On My Way are more abstract and inspired by more mysterious and often philosophical feelings about the world and our place in it, I suppose. The Valley EP has a slightly clearer sentiment all the way through. We were still inspired by our surroundings and abstract concepts but this time we tried mixing this with more relatable subjects, I think this method of writing is best shown on our track Shadow Light (live From The Pool). The sound on The Valley EP is more electronic in places however that’s something that excited us and that we intend to explore further for sure.

Katy, you have a haunting vocal delivery, that is equally serene and unique. Do you have anyone that you look to for inspiration, or been compared to anyone? 

I would say I’m definitely drawn to artists like Beach House and Kate Bush because of their powerful and instinctive vocal deliveries.

As a band, who are your favorite artists?  

We really love Kate Bush because of her total originality. We’re big fans of Kings Of Leon, we’re hoping to see them in July. More recently, Maggie Rogers.

You are also going to be playing Kendall Calling for the first time! Is it nerve-racking knowing you’ll be performing to a larger audience or are you eager to play to a sea of new faces?

We’re really happy to be playing and always excited to play to new people. It’s very rewarding and fun winning people over!

Speaking of festivals, who would make-up your ideal lineup?

 Air, Zero 7, Interpol, R.E.M, Coldplay, Kings Of Leon, Crosby, Stills and Nash, Kate Bush, Beach House and The Roots. There are some amazing lineups this summer!

Lastly, what are you most looking forward to in the coming year? 

Releasing new music and lots of gigs!

 

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A Phone Call with Christo Bowman. A Bad Suns Interview.

by Lilli Banks & Sara Valenzuela

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Photo by Marisa Shirar
The DMV Team writers, Lilli Banks and Sara Valenzuela, had the opportunity to interview Christo Bowman, lead singer from Bad Suns.
Listen to the interview here.
      Christo Bowman (Vocals, Guitar), Gavin Bennett (Bass, Vocals), Miles Morris (Drums), and Ray Libby (Guitar, Vocals) are the members of the California-based indie band Bad Suns. They’ve come far from playing small bars around Los Angeles, currently working on their two upcoming tours; ‘Heartbreaker’ and ‘Outskirts of Paradise’ tour (find dates and tickets down below). With producer Eric Palmquist, their sophomore album, Disappear Here was released September of 2016. Bad Suns has surely made their presence known in the music industry. DC Fans lining up at early hours of the morning waiting to get a good spot at one of their shows, shows the dedication their listeners have put into the guys’ musical careers. They have made an impact. Nylon Magazine stating “the band’s sound is the sort of rock that we just never get enough of: anthemic without being soulless, hard-driving while still having a heart.”

 

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Photo by Marisa Shirar
If Bad Suns sounds familiar, you might recall that they were in Lilli’s picks for album of the year!
We were lucky enough to catch Christo during rehearsal and talk about the new album, their Heartbreaker & Outskirts of Paradise tours, and their long awaited Baltimore show.
      Nearly two years ago, the Bad Suns show at the Ottobar got cancelled due to the Baltimore Riots. Christo gave us insight on that day, “I can remember being in the room altogether trying to figure out what to do. At the end of the day, it was better to not go through with it. But since then, we’ve been really wanting to come back to Baltimore. We’re really excited to make up for the last time around. The show’s been sold out for a while and it’s gonna be really fun.”
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Photo by Eliot Lee Hazel
      The new album, Disappear Here was a turning point for the band. Christo said, “We really wanted to sort of push the envelope forward a little bit. We were much more aware of who we were as a band and we felt much stronger in our identity.” With the album, they also wanted to bring their own identity to shows, their glitter zia sun logo is part of the show.  “We knew that we wanted to bring the personality and the vibe and the feeling of the album cover and the album itself into each city every night.”


     They’re very excited to get back on the road. Lilli asked about the possibility of three songs that were missed on the Disappear Here tour, but we have to wait to find out if they make it on the set!  As a closing comment, Christo said, “At the end of the day, I think that’s always the goal. We want everyone that goes home to be like ‘Wow, I don’t wanna leave’ or ‘That was amazing. That was more fun than it could’ve been.’ We just want it to be an experience that sticks out in people’s lives.”
Check to see if they’re coming to see a city near you during their Heartbreaker or Outskirts of Paradise tour! You can buy tickets here.
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Phoebe Green Interview

Interview by Corynne and Kayla Fernandez

Emerging artist, Phoebe Green, hailing all the way from Manchester, is currently prepping for her very first show. We had the chance to catch up with Phoebe and talk about what inspired her to be a musician and the ins and outs of the making of her debut album, 02:00 AM.

Lucid Dreams: Hi Phoebe! Can you tell us a little about yourself?

Phoebe Green: I’m 19 and I’m from a small seaside town called Lytham, but I live in Manchester at the moment and go to music school there. I have a mum and a dad, two sisters (the younger is 15 and plays synth for me) and my nan lives with me and is my best mate.

LD: When making your debut album, ’02:00 AM,’ what was the process like? Did you have any doubts along the way or did it come naturally?

PG: The process was dead fast but also excruciatingly slow! I write songs in about half an hour; it’s a pretty natural thing to me as my songs are heavily based on experiences and people I know, so I don’t have to spend ages thinking of concepts. The thing that takes time is recording and producing and mastering the songs. I had quite a few doubts to be honest. As soon as I wrote a new song I would hate the previous one, I change my mind so often about things, and I’m so opposed to cheesiness that I always feel that my older songs are cheesy because I wrote them when I was younger (even by a month or something). It took me a while to be completely happy with the album because I kept re-writing lyrics, but at this point I have no doubts.

LD: Being that this is your first album, what made you want to pursue music?

PG: Oh God, the dreaded question. It was actually the Jonas Brothers! When I was little I was obsessed, I read everything about them and when they discussed songwriting I was completely fixated with this idea of putting my thoughts and feelings to music. I was always an attention-seeking kid though, always wanted to be in the spotlight, I’ve wanted to be a performer for as long as I can remember, so a fusion of those two factors is what encouraged me to try writing and performing my own stuff.

LD: Out of all the tracks, what would you say is your favorite and why?

PG: Jesus, what a tough one. Literally the most intense ones: Maniac, Pure Blue, High and A Phonecall. And Nosebleed. And Watercolour Envy…

LD: How did the album artwork and title come about?

PG: The artwork was created by a good friend of mine, Amy. We met in a concert queue and have been friends since then. I named the album ’02:00 AM’ because I always think a lot when I can’t sleep, and so I would always record voice notes on my phone around the 02:00 AM mark and then write them in the morning. I wanted a cover that reflected insomnia and fatigue at the same time, so I sent Amy a picture of me rolling my eyes back, asking for it in watercolour (because of Watercolour Envy) and she created that!

LD: What or who were the inspirations for your album?

PG: People and experiences. I’m not very good at writing about things I can’t completely analyse and go into masses of detail about. I like to create imagery with my lyrics and make people see and feel what I saw and felt in those moments. I really like capturing memories in that way and I guess the album is just a diary of the past couple of years, which have simultaneously been the best and worst of my life. Very dramatic!

LD: Given Manchester’s history and its reputation in the music scene (Producing the likes of The Smiths, Oasis, The Stone Roses etc.), would you say you have been shaped by those acts and aspired similar success?

PG: Oh, definitely! I love good old British indie bands. Manchester is so culturally rich when it comes to music and art, it’s incredible. Yeah, I definitely hope to reach their level of influence on the music industry.

LD: One word to sum up your record?

PG: Honest.

LD: Your album release show is approaching, have you done any preparation? What are you most looking forward to?

PG: Soooo much preparation, mostly in the last week! I’m mostly excited for all of my friends and family to have a few drinks and celebrate with me, all my mates are home for Christmas and I can’t wait to hear what everyone thinks of the album in person. I’m so excited.

LD: A personal favorite of ours at Lucid Dreams Magazine is, ‘Isobel’. What was the musical and lyrical process like, and was it a conscious decision put that song as the final track of the album?

PG: My best mate is called Isobel, and she was just having one of those nights, so I wrote her a song. She’s honestly one of the most fascinating, beautiful people I have ever known and we have shaped each other as people so much. It was written before we moved away to uni, and the “don’t forget about me” was because I was terrified that things wouldn’t be the same when we saw each other again. Nothing has changed though, thank god! I put it as the last track because I’ve always thought it sounded like the bittersweet ending of a film. I just think it fits perfectly at the end.

LD: If you had the chance to create your dream festival lineup, who would be your 3 headliners?

PG: Shirley Temple aged 5, Catfish and the Bottlemen and HAIM.

LD: What artist or album changed the way you thought about music and impacted you in an exponential way?

PG: A Fever You Can’t Sweat Out by Panic! At the Disco. That is one of the most incredibly written albums I have ever heard in my life; the lyrics are so complex and poetic and subtly vulgar, it’s absolutely mental. Absolutely nothing is sugar-coated and yet it sounds so beautifully poetic. I cannot praise Ryan Ross’ ability to write songs enough. He truly is a genius.

LD: What do you want your fans and new listeners to take away from your album?

PG: I think we need to really engage with people and moments and appreciate people for their intriguing mannerisms and flaws. I don’t know if that’s something that comes across in my songs or not but I’m literally always drawn to weirdos! Appreciate peoples’ differences, people are art! Haha, that’s all.

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